Posts Tagged ‘magical realism’

I love to leave references in my work, Easter eggs, as it were.  Some of them are much less obvious than others.  The name of one of my protagonists, Lilja Perhonen, is one, a big one.  I also leave clues that are sort of homages to writers that have had a large impact on me.

Take this excerpt from my second book, Sword of the Butterfly:

“Wilbraham?” came the inevitable summons, the professor moving his head around as though in search of whom this may be, though nearly all of the small body of the class had by now been announced.

“Here, sir,” he finally spoke, his voice an odd mixture of deep, gruff, but with a scratch of break, as though of pubescence or merely suffering from some chronic allergy.

“That is a good, old name from England,” Professor Edwards remarked with utmost sincerity, then consulting his list, looking back up, “Pothos? That’s your first name?”

Pothos nodded, slowly, almost laboriously.

“Your parents must also be students of mythology to give you a great name like that,” the instructor carried on, letting his dark, bushy eyebrows rise as though throwing a question mark onto the supposition.

That alludes to what becomes a huge Easter egg.  It also references an experience I had back in college, but I wouldn’t expect anyone to figure that out.  The layers do begin to get a little complicated, and sometimes I forget why I crafted things the way I did.  Still, I think it adds to the journey, and I hope there are those who discover these things and feel the same.

If you’ve read my work and think you have some guessed, please leave a comment.  If you have not, then grab a book and begin the hunt!

My Amazon Author Page

gothic_egg_by_mehmetkursat

I think sometimes people get an incorrect impression of my book merely from the name, Dance of the Butterfly.  Sounds romantic, doesn’t it?  It has ‘dance’ and ‘butterfly’ in it.  It must be a romance.  Well, it does have romantic elements.  There is a relationship that buds and blooms as a core plot point, but it is not just about that, and it is not all nice and flowery.  There is some splatter. Quite a bit of it, actually.  I am not one to often pull punches.  I got myself in a bit of hot water during a poetry contest many years upon years ago, because I don’t feel the need to overly censor.  I have since learned more of a balance between raw and refined.

In that vein, I have been posting snippets of the final climax of my book, and things do get bloody.  Allow me to share another …


One of the guests lies on the ground, in a growing pool of the red liquid, another guest atop him. The larger man above is savagely stabbing into the prone body of the other, holding a torn piece of metal, having been drafted as an improvised weapon. Each stab into the left side of the victim’s torso produces more spurts of fresh fluid, the attacker painted with it, giving him even more of a horrific, demented look than his own expressions and actions already convey.

“He’s killing my husband!” a nearby woman screams, her own shrieks part of those making up the cacophony, though if the lack of resistance on the part of her spouse indicates anything, he may already be dead.

The guards point their weapons, nearing the terrible happening.

“Get out of the way!” Duilio commands, and the other party-goers and workers do just that, clearing more area around the attack.

“Do something! Do something!” the woman, rushes over to Duilio, her heels clicking on the pavement.

The guards look to the inspector, and Duilio spares a short moment of assessment, then, “Stop him.”

Gunshots blast out, causing more screams and dispersal of the crowd. The attacker is quickly removed from atop his victim, crumbling away and to the ground, flopping to his back as the firing ceases, his breath coming out ragged and wet.


So, there you go.  I hope you enjoyed it, and I hope it whet your appetite for more.  If so, please visit my Amazon Author Page to buy any of my publications.  Thank you.dotb-twitter

“So, in Finland, witches are not automatically treated as bad?”

“No.” She shakes her head once, more of a slowly shifting movement. “Witchcraft is a very big part of Finnish history, culture, and religion. Though we had good witches, and black magic was not allowed.”

“Where is Mount Kyöpeli?” asks another, not waiting to be called upon but pitching the question in the ensuing silence.

She turns her eyes in that direction, still meandering as she talks, the images on the large screen changing in a series of slow dissolves, giving backdrop to her words.

“You can only get there by flying and magic. It is said to be located in a secret place, close to the border of Tuonela, the Finnish land of dead.’

“It is also said that it is actually possible physically, or even mentally, to travel in Tuonela and go have a chat with your dead friends and relatives and other people,” she carries on, a curve to her lips. “There are tales that witches and sages have traveled there to learn long lost lore and spells. Only problem is that it’s very hard to get back from there. There are many guardians. Cats are but one example in our own world.”


I draw from many sources and lore in my book, Dance of the Butterfly.  It was important to me to show varying perspectives.  This is also part of why I chose to set it in a very cosmopolitan city.  There are many subtle (and not so subtle) references that weave into the overall puzzle of the story.

Please visit my Amazon Author Page for both books in the series.  Thank you.

dotb-twitter

“There is sufficient lack of blood volume for what is expected in the human body,” she repeats.

He throws up his hands, scoffing, turning away. The other gives her something of a sympathetic look. She is not needful of either reaction.

“Detective Pasztor, I am the coroner. You are the detective,” she reminds him.

“I know that,” he snaps, turning, glaring at her, “What did the killer do with it? Are we dealing with a vampire?”
__________________________

The savage serial killer continues to plague the City. Is it some sort of human-animal hybrid or worse? The carnage left behind is unsettling, confusing. The local police have no idea how deeply this goes.


One of the core elements to the plot in my first novel, Dance of the Butterfly, is something of a murder mystery.  It is not handled in the traditional sense, mainly because it is only one of the myriad facets making up the overall “secret” within the story.  It was very enjoyable exploring this vein of the tale, especially leaving out all the little bread crumbs for readers.

I humbly invite you to see for yourself in Dance of the Butterfly, the first novel in my urban fantasy series. For 18+ readers.

Dance of the Butterfly – print version
Dance of the Butterfly – electronic editions

dotb-twitter

The City in which the majority of my first book takes place ends up becoming quite important.  It is an urban center with a swarm of energies, a nexus, and thus it attracts much unto itself, good or bad.  Of the myriad things happening, one of them is the presence of serial killer, a savage murderer displaying a deep degree of barbarity.  The identity and purpose of this criminal is central to the goings-on within the story.


“The thorax has been rent quite savagely, initially torn open by three large wounds, ranging from ten to thirteen inches, the condition of the flesh indicating this was not a bladed weapon, nor were they done by the same hand.”

“What?” Mahler asks, looking up from viewing the printed report which lies bound in a heavy stock covering.

“It wasn’t a knife or dagger or similar bladed weapon. I consulted an old friend of mine who ended up getting into veterinarian medicine, and she agrees that this looks like it was caused by claws.”

“Are you saying an animal did this?” Pasztor chimes in.


Does this have anything to do with the valuable book in the university’s secured collection? Does the young librarian Lilja have any clue as to what is really going on?

Find out in Dance of the Butterfly, the first book in my urban fantasy series –

Dance of the Butterfly – print version
Dance of the Butterfly – electronic editions

db-wrap

The main goal of this site is to convey my writings and myself.  I have written a series of urban fantasy books (two published, the third in progress), and I hope to garner readers who have a positive experience.  As any author may tell you, this is a very personal exposure.  Though it may be hidden in layers of metaphor and subtext, we are revealing ourselves to do this.  In my case, my works are very autobiographical.  I hope my followers enjoy the various blog posts I make, and I hope it allows you to learn more about me.  However, what I’d like to do is entice those who may not have read my books to want to do so.  I shall be giving up little teasers, if you will, of that tale.  If you have read them, please feel free to comment.


An explosion rocks the manor of a prestigious family just as they make a critical discovery that could affect the entire world. Not long after, a similar secret is uncovered in a major metropolis in central Europe. This same city is beset with heinous crimes – sex-trafficking, serial murder. All of this threads the weave of a great threat to humanity.

Lilja Perhonen is a young librarian from Finland. She left her home to escape her own demons, only to find much worse waiting for her in the City.  As curator of a prestigious university’s rare books, she learns that one in particular holds greater treasures than she had ever imagined. Her curiosity and bravery lead her to find out more, despite the real danger it poses to her.

Learn more about Lilja.

Find out what happens in Dance of the Butterfly, the first book in my urban fantasy series. For 18+ readers.

Dance of the Butterfly – print version
Dance of the Butterfly – electronic editions

dotb-twitter

In my debut novel, Dance of the Butterfly, I introduce a new character about halfway through the book.  This was equal parts inspiration and deliberation.  I found it satisfied me as a writer (and reader) in many ways, even bucking some tropes.  It allowed me to shape and even realize a few patterns in my first book that I intentionally followed in the sequel and plan to use in the third installment.  Before I digress further, this new character is an odd fellow.  I don’t want to give away too much, but he shows up from seemingly nowhere to find a place center stage in the unfolding events, perhaps even being a key to understanding what all is happening and why.  He is the subject of today’s #fridayfeyday post.


He lies upon the thin mattress, the meager offering upon the rickety metal frame, staring up at the ceiling. He sees patterns there, images resolving within the texturing of the sheet rock, mingling with the tiny cracks of age and disrepair, the flaking of paint.

He wants to sleep. He doesn’t want to sleep. His pale blue eyes remain open, rarely blinking, staring at the ceiling. His thoughts are taken by pathways and strange images, shadows and flashing glimpses of an invisible world. He see things he does not understand, does not want to see.


I hope this helps to stimulate the appetite.  Please buy, read, and review my debut novel, Dance of the Butterfly, and then continue on with the sequel.  Thank you!

Dance of the Butterfly – print version
Dance of the Butterfly – digital editions

dotb-twitter